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General Upholstery Questions and Comments => General Discussion => Topic started by: SteveA on October 24, 2017, 10:36:20 AM

Title: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on October 24, 2017, 10:36:20 AM
Ottoman

An account asked me to make a service call to fill the corner of the attached top cushion of an ottoman.  I'm bringing the regulator but is there a way to access the corner if I remove the dust cover or not even possible ?

SA
   


Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: kodydog on October 24, 2017, 10:54:00 AM
You could remove the dust cove and then cut a slit into the spring cover (burlap?) there may also be some type of padding you will have to rip through. This should give you access to the zipper, if there is one. The fun part will be trying to get your hand in there.

Then when finished hand sew the spring cover closed. Problem is you never know what you'll find when you take the dust cover off. If its plywood you're out of luck.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: Darren Henry on October 25, 2017, 06:20:03 AM
Any time I go on a service call like that the small compressor. stapler etc,,,in case I have to rip something down to the frame. Oh yeah---and a drop cloth grin,
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: karenward on November 16, 2017, 07:08:56 PM
I think that it is never hard to call service
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on December 18, 2017, 01:13:27 PM
Went to the residence today and tried to reshape the corner by forcing the foam forward from the far side while holding the case - not much improvement.  Tried the regulator - no help.   Looked under the dust cover but a view up to the corner of the cushion is blocked by a sheet of synthetic burlap. 
This may come into the shop and short of taking it apart I was wondering if I could make a hole in the synthetic burlap or with a seam ripper try yo get the fabric apart just at that corner then blind stitch back. 

(http://i934.photobucket.com/albums/ad181/SteveA_2010/th_Stern%2010_zpsjhht5q3r.jpg) (http://s934.photobucket.com/user/SteveA_2010/media/Stern%2010_zpsjhht5q3r.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: sofadoc on December 18, 2017, 02:45:57 PM
I'd try a hole in the synthetic burlap first.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on December 18, 2017, 08:00:34 PM
You're right that sounds a lot safer than trying to un-stitch the corner -
I also tried some steam - helped a bit but not enough.  Either they didn't wrap the foam or they didn't cut out the v's on the turn when sewing or maybe just bad sewing ? 
Thanks,
SA
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: kodydog on December 18, 2017, 08:15:39 PM
I agree with sofa. Try to access the attached top cushion through the synthetic burlap first. It would be best to do this in shop so the customer does not see you cannibalizing their ottoman. I'm guessing there just is not enough foam to fill attached top cushion. Any chance this is a down envelope with foam inside?
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: gene on December 18, 2017, 08:30:20 PM
Cutting through the synthetic burlap hopefully takes you to the zipper. I think I would cut the synthetic burlap in the center just enough to see the zipper. If I can see the zipper, which almost always goes diagonal, I would then cut the synthetic burlap on the same diagonal.

There may be cotton or poly batting between the zipper and the synthetic burlap. I would do the same thing with this. Cut a hole near the center to see the zipper and then cut the padding and synthetic zipper on a matching diagonal.

If you have the cambric off, taking the entire casing off is just a matter of removing the staples from around the bottom edge. As well as the welt cord if that is any.

I would stitch the synthetic burlap with thread when done. I may even staple some jute webbing up against the synthetic burlap in case someone using the ottoman for a stool and steps on it.

gene
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on December 19, 2017, 12:06:18 PM
I don't think it's an envelop - when I stuck the regulator in it just felt like foam no wrap - .  I'll cut the burlap and see where that takes me.  I have a lot of faith in the k-spray glue to make a patch to the burlap and add a few stitches to be extra safe. 

(http://i934.photobucket.com/albums/ad181/SteveA_2010/th_Stern%208_zps1xyfph7s.jpg) (http://s934.photobucket.com/user/SteveA_2010/media/Stern%208_zps1xyfph7s.jpg.html)

Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: sofadoc on December 19, 2017, 12:13:19 PM
I have a lot of faith in the k-spray glue to make a patch to the burlap and add a few stitches to be extra safe.
Another cheat method is to cut a strip of plywood and slip it in to the slit that you made in the synthetic burlap, and then staple each side of the slit to the plywood.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on December 19, 2017, 02:44:56 PM
Thanks - that will make it strong for sure and much easier than stitching
SA
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: 65Buick on December 19, 2017, 05:24:08 PM
I thought you guys didn't use synthetic burlap?
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: gene on December 19, 2017, 08:40:02 PM
sofad: that's a great idea. Thanks.

gene
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: gene on December 19, 2017, 08:44:06 PM
65buick: I don't use synthetic burlap. If I want to put support on something like an ottoman I'll use jute webbing. Factories like it because it's fast and takes no skill to staple down.

It seems to me that it will start to sag sooner than later.

gene
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: sofadoc on December 19, 2017, 09:28:23 PM
I thought you guys didn't use synthetic burlap?

This is an existing job that Steve is repairing.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: 65Buick on December 20, 2017, 01:38:29 PM
I misread it, that you were using extra synthetic burlap for the repair.

To me all synthetic burlap is just woven polypropylene, and then brushed on one side to avoid squeaks.
My loveseat used this, and they were probably predicting sagging, so they used tension rods underneath to help support.
I also figured they have some machine or device to help stretch it tight since I doubt that could be done tight enough by hand.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: kodydog on December 20, 2017, 08:03:49 PM
From time to time I run across the synthetic spring cover. I don't see that is is better or worse than burlap. When recovering furniture I often leave it in place if it is still in good condition. Some time ago I acquired a roll and used it without fear it would fail. Here is what Hickory Springs has to offer.


SPRING COVER
FLW
A needlepunched woven polypropylene fabric that is widely used for its softness. FLW is available in a natural color with a wide range of standard widths to reduce your material waste. FLW can be used as an insulating fabric over back springs as well as in no-spring backs. We recommend that strip webbing be used in no-spring backs.

Duotex
This needlepunched nonwoven polypropylenefabric is an excellent choice for spring cover. Duotex offers low noise, high strength, and excellent tailoring for this application. Duotex is available in 2.3oz, 2.7oz, 3.1oz, and 3.5oz persquare yard. Colors include white, black, gray, and tan.

Tricon
This spunbonded polyester nonwoven fabric offers excellent value as a spring cover fabric. Tricon offers excellent strength, durability, and softness for this application. Available in both gray and black in weights of 3.2oz, 3.5oz, and 4oz per square yard. We recommend the 3.2oz or 3.5oz for this application.

SK Laminates
These composites of spunbonded polypropylene represent our best value as a spring cover fabric. We ultrasonically bond several plies of nonwoven to give our SK Products high strength while retaining the softness of polypropylene. Our SK Laminates are available in 3oz, 3.5oz, and 4oz constructions in both white and powder blue colors.
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: SteveA on December 21, 2017, 11:39:30 AM
Ian - Iv'e never used Synthetic Burlap in lieu of the webbing with the red stripe.  I do keep 10 yards of it around and use it on the bottom of coil spring chairs  when I think the webbing is still OK but I feel safer stapling on the SB over the existing webbing to sure up the bottom.  Keeps a lower profile than additional webbing. 
SA
Title: Re: Ottoman
Post by: 65Buick on December 21, 2017, 11:47:12 AM
I would agree with that Steve. I cringe when I see black stripe used for the seats. I have even seen youtube vids by pros demonstrating the springs using black stripe.