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: Zig Zag machine  ( 1835 )
bobbin
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« : June 20, 2014, 10:08:38 AM »

Who has one? what make and model?  Do you like it? why/why not.

I don't own one but I've operated them before (Consews).  I found them to be cranky in general, but the last one was so poorly maintained it would be unfair to judge them all by that one.  I have gotten requests for a zigzag stitch recently and am toying with getting one.  Thoughts?
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« #1 : June 21, 2014, 06:35:17 PM »

I had an older singer, sorry dont remember the model now but didnt like it and got rid of it and kept my old 42-5 straight stitch singer. It sewed decent but took me too long to initially set up and then running ---switching to different thicknesses seemed to mess up the adjustment and had to stop , readjust, etc. just a pain when i was used to the 42-5 that would just pound thru most anything, lol.
MinUph
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« #2 : June 21, 2014, 07:27:36 PM »

I use to use a home machine for zig zagging certain fabrics. It wasn't fast but it stopped the fraying on thinks like arm caps, head throws etc. I no longer have that machine it was a Sears portable.

Paul
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Grebo
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« #3 : June 22, 2014, 05:00:46 AM »

That's one of the reasons I bought the sailrite LZ1, we don't need a zig zag for canvas work, but it does have it's use's.
Small repair's, odd repairs, great for binding, if you think something is going to stretch & it's not suitable for a serger/overlocker.
small sail repairs better with a zig zag because of the stress & stain in a sail ( not something I do much of ).
The sailrite is a walking foot zigzag just a bit on the small side ( domestic size ). I don't zig zag enough to invest in a full industrial version so find this a great addition, plus it's sort of portable( heavy). Go's on holiday with me sometimes.
(It does straight stitch as well).

Suzi
« : June 22, 2014, 05:05:20 AM Grebo »

bobbin
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« #4 : June 22, 2014, 02:16:38 PM »

Thanks for the input, you guys.  Not sure what I'll do... not sure how much I "care", frankly.  But you've given me great insight.  Thanks!
bobbin
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« #5 : August 20, 2014, 07:07:58 AM »

I returned home yesterday with an elderly Singer 107W-1 (I'm guessing the head is 60 yrs. old thereabouts).  It's no thing of beauty (repainted grey, the paint on the bed is peeling and it needs a good cleaining, it's kind of grimey).  Singer made plenty of them, parts are still readily available, and as with any machine, maintain it and keep it lubricated and it will chug along reliably.  Newer clutch motor, K legs, and a green bench top that is in very nice condition.  The machine itself had been serviced but had sat idle in a corner for a year (longer?).  It ran fine, but was pretty clunky (bone dry!), so I didn't push it.  $150.

On my mechanic's advice (he serviced it the last time) I sprayed the moving parts with Aeorkroil and let it sit overnight.  I fired it up this AM and ran it steadily for a few minutes.  It sounds very different this morning than it did yesterday afternoon. Next step is to blow it out with the compressor and then oil it thoroughly with sewing machine oil.

My only required "investment" will be a chain for the foot lift and a new throat plate.  The one on it now has some sort of "dorsal fin" that sits proud in what would be the centre of the zig-zag.  I was told it was used to line up 2 pcs. of fabric that will be joined by the stitch; never seen anything like it before and since the machine was originally used in a sail loft it must have something to do with a specific operation.  Next move will be obtaining and owner's manual and parts book. 

The bobbin is inserted from the back, it actually sits behind the needle; never seen anything like it before.  And the bobbins are considerably thinner than any I've seen in recent history, more in line with those used on my 1943 W&G rotary take up.  And the bobbin case is threaded differently, too.  The bobbin rotates counterclockwise and the thread is fed under the tension tongue but then it's pulled down through a notch and back up through another slot before you insert the case.  I rather like that, it makes a very secure feed. 
sofadoc
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« #6 : August 20, 2014, 07:56:07 AM »

I'm zig-zag ignorant.

I've had a few opportunities to acquire one. But as with other specialty machines such as double needle, serger/overlock, or cylinder bed, I'm not sure if I would get enough use out of one to justify the space it would occupy.

Assuming the 107W-1 doesn't have reverse, how do you lock zig-zag stitches? Same as with any other non-reverse machine?

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kodydog
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« #7 : August 20, 2014, 08:57:40 AM »

I have a problem that I think is relevant to I'm hijacking this thread. Sorry Bobbin.

I picked up some wicker cushions for a patio set. The old fabric is cotton and the lady was concerned about the seams that were unraveling and coming apart. She likes to throw them in the washer when they get dirty. We have a Baby Lock serger that works good on cottons but the new fabric is Sunbrella and our Baby Lock will not sew it.

The weave on the new fabric is much tighter than the old fabric so I'm thinking, when sewing, take the usual 1/2" seam then when the cushions are finished go back and sew another real tight stitch at 1/4". There are no welts.

I know you shouldn't wash upholstery fabric in a machine but if I tell her that she will be disappointed.

Do you think this will work? Any other ideas?
« : August 20, 2014, 08:58:25 AM kodydog »

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bobbin
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« #8 : August 20, 2014, 09:24:21 AM »

I don't see why that wouldn't work, Kody..  But I'm surprised your Baby Lock won't stitch on Sunbrella.  Sure, it's heavier, but I wouldn't think that much heavier.  Have you tried loosening the tensions?  You could also try searing the raw edges of the Sunbrella over an open candle flame; that used to be the recommended way to prevent ravelling on synthetic back in "old days" before overlocks became mainstream.  Whenever I overlock pcs. I always do it before I assemble them.  My overlock has what's called a tractor foot and it's too wide (3/4-1") to run past applied welting.  

Correct, Sofa., no reverse.  I will either do the "presser foot lift shuffle" or simply move the work back and stitch on again over the first few stitches.  The other option would be shortening the stitch length on take off and lengthen it as desired after "tacking".   And believe me, I'm pretty z-z ignorant, too!  Here's hoping the learning curve isn't too steep.  :)
« : August 20, 2014, 09:28:20 AM bobbin »
Darren Henry
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« #9 : August 20, 2014, 05:20:45 PM »

I cut my Sunbrella (and Sinbrella fabric) with a heat knife to keep the edges from fraying. I didn't buy the engle unit---only the blade and foot,and stuck them in a $20 soldering gun. Works every bit as well as the engle's I have used.

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MinUph
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« #10 : August 20, 2014, 07:42:33 PM »

There are some fabrics that require a 5/8" seam allowance. Sunbrella is not one but I mention this as I remembered that and that in itself is a revelation. :)
Zig Zag is a good alternative to other methods but I don't think she will have a problem with the sunbrella unraveling in the wash. Zig Zaggin or serging the edges would make the customer feel better though.

Paul
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kodydog
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« #11 : August 20, 2014, 08:33:44 PM »

You could also try searing the raw edges of the Sunbrella over an open candle flame; that used to be the recommended way to prevent ravelling on synthetic back in "old days" before overlocks became mainstream. 

Great idea Bobbin, Thanks.

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kodydog
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« #12 : August 22, 2014, 10:01:09 PM »

Finished the cushions today and used a very low flame on a blow torch to sear the salvage edge. Worked like a charm. Thanks again Bobbin.
« : August 22, 2014, 10:02:40 PM kodydog »

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bobbin
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« #13 : August 23, 2014, 05:10:53 AM »

Excellent news, Kody.. 

There is another little gadget that might interest you, too.  It's a hot knife and you see them a lot in sail lofts.  It's about the length of a pencil with a paddle on the end and it's electric.  It gets hot and shops use it to "butter" raw edges, cut webbing, and burn back bits of thread.  The real cheapies can be had for around $45-65 (depends on how hot it needs to be).  I bought an Ungar and I also bought the little protective stand.  The first shop I worked for used a soldering gun to clean up work. 
Darren Henry
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« #14 : August 23, 2014, 07:52:03 AM »



this is the rig I have and mentioned earlier. I cut all my pieces with it rather than going over the seams later. Zoom in and have close look at the blade and foot. They are the Engle parts that allow me to cut without burning the table. They work like electric shears. The soldering gun works as well as the Engle power unit at 1/10th the price.

Life is a short one way trip, don't blow it!Live hard,die young and leave no ill regrets!
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