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| | |-+  Zipper Plaque - Vertical Pattern, Sloppy Stitching and Shifting Fabric
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: Zipper Plaque - Vertical Pattern, Sloppy Stitching and Shifting Fabric  ( 724 )
D3Gilmore
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« : July 13, 2017, 10:22:11 AM »

I read Gene's post yesterday and this new one relates to it somewhat.  I have a vertical stripe pattern I'm trying to match on patio cushions.  I have two problems happening when I stitch the zipper tape to the basted steam that meets in the middle (it's tugging and shifting the fabric (thus making my lines wavy) and my stitches aren't straight.

My Janome isn't commercial - so my zipper foot doesn't have teeth to dig in to the top fabric to feed it consistently with the zipper tape.  (I'm making a bigger and bigger case for my husband to give in to buying a Juki DNU 1541) but until that happens, does anyone have a suggestion on how to get a better fit/stitch?

When I lift up my fabric to make sure it is in line with the center of the zipper coil, it seems that's when a slight shift happens, making my stitch line sloppy.

I'm not sure that pushing the top fabric to help feet it through will make it any better - but it may cause a wavy "bacon" effect.

I know of a couple different ways to conceal my zipper but I think the problem is the machine and it's limited abilities (although I'm not saying I couldn't use a better technique).

Thanks all,

Deana

Here are a couple pics:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_b-s34UOXi1aGpyTllLbnllajg/view?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_b-s34UOXi1bWY5enpDY0VtelE/view?usp=sharing

SteveA
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« #1 : July 13, 2017, 11:18:22 AM »

Buy the new machine when he isn't looking.
How about the method of sewing two pieces of fabric together - sew the zipper down on top of the unfolded allowance and open the seam with a seam ripper
SA
D3Gilmore
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« #2 : July 13, 2017, 12:13:43 PM »

Steve,

Believe me, I want to buy it the moment I get a big slipcover job.

If you look at the pic, I sewed a 5" panel in half, cut the fold open, then lined the zipper tape up the middle and sewed up both sides of the coil.  I just haven't gone back to rip the seam open to reveal the tape yet.  I wanted to see what may solve this horrible stitch job first.
kodydog
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« #3 : July 13, 2017, 08:52:35 PM »

Its frustrating trying to sew with an inadequate machine. When you get your new machine make sure it is a double walking foot. Even with an industrial machine you will find fabrics that it will not like. Sometimes you have to try different techniques until it comes out right.

Its hard to say whats going on without being there. To me it looks like your thread is too far away from the zipper. But that still doesn't explain the waviness. The fabric looks thick and zipper fabric is thick. It could just be too much for your machine. But try this. While sewing the fabric to the zipper stretch it slightly as you go along. Stretch the top away from the needle and the bottom toward your chest. At the same time folding and feeding it into the machine. Sometimes when it comes to zippers you have to be a contortionist. If your are fighting or forcing the fabric it is too much for your machine to handle.

Another thing you could try is iron the fold flat before you start sewing. This may be one less thing you have to hassle with as you are dealing with every thing else.

Just looked at the pics again. The second one dosn't look that bad. can't you just stretch it a little to get it to line up?
  
« : July 13, 2017, 08:58:41 PM kodydog »

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
http://northfloridachair.com/index.html
baileyuph
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« #4 : July 13, 2017, 09:24:07 PM »

You did a perfect job of basting the two boxing halves together with the machine.

Going forward from there, the basted halves and zipper will have to be temporarily joined so they move through "together".  With that understanding, using the machine what goes through the needle now will have to have some manual help to make sure the joined halves and the zipper move through together.  So, measure registration marks that would verify the movement desired is marked on both the tape and the two zipper boxing halves.

Someday, when you get the compound walking Juki, you will be amazed how good you are with the current machine.

I would loan you a machine at this point and I am sure with the desired machine, you would smile with glee.

Every machine has it virtues, the mention of slip covers, well with some of the thinner fabrics, the little Janome will have its place.  Us the right machine at the right time is the desired way to go.  Sometimes, my walking foot is too much machine and then, other times it is the one to use.

You are a natural at this game and good!  Don't get discouraged.  Plus, it is obvious you love what you are doing.


Doyle
D3Gilmore
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« #5 : July 14, 2017, 12:42:15 AM »

Thank you all for your input - I have to remember I was using an $80 Singer sewing machine not that long ago.  I love my Janome, but like Doyle said, there are pros and cons for both type of machines, depending on fabric.

I appreciate the encouragement - I definitely am a perfectionist and need to learn to move on when it's good enough for the consumer's eye.  My client provided me just enough fabric (discontinued bolt) to not make any major mistakes.  The pros with this fabric is that I have lines to use for my center marks and to know when I'm going off.  

After reading Gene's post recently about horizontal lines on a zipper plaque making it easier to not have to pattern match, I realized my lines matched on the front of the cushion, but my plaque did not.  So, now I'm bound and determined to make those line up as well.

I will try your suggestions tomorrow and see which work best in this situation.

Oh, I also meant to inquire about using a monofilament thread? Would it be less noticeable or is it even advisable?

I'll post a finished product soon! Thanks again,

Deana
« : July 14, 2017, 12:47:39 AM D3Gilmore »
baileyuph
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« #6 : July 14, 2017, 07:10:49 AM »

Thread - to some (me included), a color coordinated thread can offer verification of craftsmanship and precision.  It is additive.  Clear?  Well, it can be a good business decision that reduces investment and time - higher efficiency. 

Therefore, for a low volume operation striving for quality and affect; that could be the answer.

Doyle
kodydog
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« #7 : July 14, 2017, 08:06:48 AM »

If you have ever picked apart a 10 year old cushion with mono thread you will know why I advise to stay away from it. You can take a 10 year old cushion and rip the seams apart, by hand, with very little effort. I have seen this type thread fail many times. After only a few years it starts to rot. It is a cheap alternative to colored nylon thread. Some upholsterers like to use it because then they never have to change the thread. This saves only a few minutes per job. High quality upholsterers use nylon colored thread for indoor furniture applications.

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
http://northfloridachair.com/index.html
D3Gilmore
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« #8 : July 14, 2017, 10:48:25 AM »

Thank you,

My goal is to be a quality craftsman and cutting corners is something I want to avoid.  I'll stick with the colored Nylon.  Thank you again.
gene
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« #9 : July 14, 2017, 05:47:45 PM »

I've had striped fabric that was a pain to keep the stripes straight on the zipper. I've used fusible tape and fusible lining before with some good results. I would not want to do this all the time - too much time involved.

With the fusible tape I steamed a fold in the fabric as kodYdog mentioned and then steamed double sided tape inside the fold. With fusible lining I cut long strips of single sided ling and steamed it to the fabric panels and then folded and steamed them.

RE mono thread. I think what you are referring to KodyDog is thin mono thread that is used in clothing and window treatments and quilts. .04 thickness and up is common. I use .10 which is made for upholstery. I use it on one of my machines simply because that is what I learned to use. I also use it for outdoor sewing. I cannot tear this thread apart. It will last longer than any fabric. It does save time in not needing to change thread colors and a bit less expensive because I don't need to have so much inventory of thread. It comes in clear for light color fabrics and smoke for dark color fabrics.

I don't know why I use 69 Nylon on my Juki LU 562, which has a smaller bobbin than the Juki LU 563, but I do.

gene

QUALITY DOES NOT COST, IT PAYS!
Mojo
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« #10 : July 14, 2017, 09:34:49 PM »

Deana:

Call Bob Kovar our resident machine supplier and order your Juki.

Tell your husband I gave you permission to do so. :)

Chris
gene
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« #11 : July 15, 2017, 04:48:08 AM »

Other things you can try: Use a very small stitch length. Sew slowly. Lessen the presser foot tension, and gently pull the fabric/zipper  through the sewing machine with one hand and guide it with the other hand, as you sew.

Welcome to the world of fabric. When you get this fabric perfect, the next fabric will have totally different characteristics.

Good luck,

gene


QUALITY DOES NOT COST, IT PAYS!
D3Gilmore
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« #12 : July 15, 2017, 12:59:31 PM »

Thank you all for your feedback.  When Kodydog mentioned my stitches looked a little far from the zipper coil, the only thing I could do to get closer would be to change from my zipper foot (which is rather wide) to my cording foot.  I also took others' advice and switched threads to a better coordinating color (in the hopes of hiding an inconsistent stitch).

If that plan didn't work, I was going to try what others had suggested (i.e. presser foot tension, slower speed, holding fabric).

I'm pleased and equally shocked to say the cording foot worked.  It kept my stitches close enough and in line with the zipper coil.  While I did notice the fabric pull a little, rather than flip my fabric 180 degrees to sew up the other panel, I just shifted the fabric to the right, placed it under the left cording foot (I have a double welt cording foot) and shifted my needle accordingly.  (One plus to my Janome).  Now that both sides of my zipper plaque were "pulled" down in the same direction (at least), when I ripped the basted seam in the middle and rubbed my finger down the center to realign the fabric stripes, they matched up well!

Cording foot for the win.

This experience once again reminds me that learning your machines capabilities, limitations, your fabric's properties and examining the way it responds to pressure, you can manipulate it to work in your favor!

Here is a couple new pics.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_b-s34UOXi1cUE3R3E3VXp6NDg/view?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_b-s34UOXi1ZTFWcnV1Q21DeTA/view?usp=sharing


Thanks again,

Deana
baileyuph
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« #13 : July 15, 2017, 08:23:46 PM »

You know what you can do now!  It doesn't get any better than this.

Regarding the trip you just made with different feet, my compound walkers have flat seaming feet in different widths ---- from zipper, to standard width flat feet and flat feet with in between widths.  For clarity, I will often stay with a flat foot (feet) but switch to a pair offering intermediate widths.

These options are probably available for you machine, not that you need to change a thing
in your zipper performance.

Nice work!

Doyle
kodydog
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« #14 : July 15, 2017, 08:28:14 PM »

Perfect!

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
http://northfloridachair.com/index.html
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