UPHOLSTERY DISCUSSION BOARD
HOW TO UPHOLSTER FORUM

Rostov Upholstery Supplies Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
January 24, 2018, 02:36:38 AM
How To Reupholster A Couch, Chair, Ottoman.
Recover Car And Boat Seats. DVDs
Foam Cutters $130+
1/2" and 3/8" crown staple guns- air and Maestri electric.
Upholstery Tools
Long Nose Staplers $124
Sunbrella Fabric     Complete line of Sunbrela fabrics. We also custom sew beautiful cushions from Sunbrella.
Custom Cushions     Custom cushions sewn at a high level of craftsmanship. Choose from fabrics and a range of quality foam.



: Check out CoachTrim's Advanced Leather Workshop and Basic Sewing Course on Suppliers Page
***Please click here www.facebook.com/upholster.upholstery and click "LIKE" for our UPHOLSTER Facebook business page (it will help me promote this free site)-Ken***



 
 EZ Foam Cutters with 240 volts and plugs for Australia, New Zealand and UK and EU.
SPECIAL 110V MODELS $130 (limited time!!) http://www.upholster.com/toolkits/Foam-cutter.html



+  My Community
|-+  General Upholstery Questions and Comments
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  My first experience with upholstery
« previous next »
: 1 [2] 3 4
: My first experience with upholstery  ( 12305 )
sawdustar
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 67


Pro Toothpick Maker


« #15 : September 14, 2010, 09:50:14 PM »

I finally figure out that I have 3 different welting feet and a double welting foot. It appears that one of the welting feet is for 1/16" chord and another is about a 1/4" welting foot. I picked the one in the middle of the two and we used that one for the 5/32" welting. It worked pretty good if you asked me since this is the first time the LOML and I have ever used a welting foot.  ;)

I have GOT to do something about that clutch motor. Wide open or stop just doesn't get it. I know that "finesse" on the pedal and one can learn to control the speed of the machine, but I have a lead foot and I can get it to just start and then it takes off while I'm trying to figure out how to keep it all under some kind of manageable control.  :-[

I've seen a lot of servo motors on eBay and it appears that the price is all over the place and I "think" that I need to get a 3/4 HP servo motor to replace the clutch motor. Is 3/4 HP too much or should I get a 1/2 HP motor and go with that?

We've started covering the chair...got the inner wings done on both arms. Starting to work on the front of the chair next and working Naugahyde is a real challenge to get it all the way ya think it needs to go. I already know of a couple of mistakes and one of them will be fairly noticeable when looking at the front of both arms at once.  :-[  >:(

But, We are already planning on doing another recliner but this time, in cloth.  ;)

Yea, We have a LOT to learn, but at least the LOML and I can do this together and it's an inside job as well....so that makes it good too.  :)

Thanks a Bunch,
Dennis Peacock
sofadoc
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +1/-0
: 4348


All types of upholstery.....except cars and boats.


« #16 : September 14, 2010, 10:24:22 PM »

Yes, a 1/4" welt foot is appropriate for 5/32 cording. I know that you are talking about getting a new machine a year from now. If you can hold out til then, you'll probably get a better "package deal" on a new head, stand, and servo motor.
Those E- Bay stores have some tempting prices. But many of them don't really even know anything about walking foot machines, and will sell you the wrong motor for what you're trying to do. I wouldn't worry too much about HP when choosing a servo motor. Gregg sold me mine. I have no idea what the HP is.

"Perfection is the greatest enemy of profitability" - Mark Cuban
sawdustar
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 67


Pro Toothpick Maker


« #17 : September 15, 2010, 07:40:08 AM »

Yes, a 1/4" welt foot is appropriate for 5/32 cording. I know that you are talking about getting a new machine a year from now. If you can hold out til then, you'll probably get a better "package deal" on a new head, stand, and servo motor.
Those E- Bay stores have some tempting prices. But many of them don't really even know anything about walking foot machines, and will sell you the wrong motor for what you're trying to do. I wouldn't worry too much about HP when choosing a servo motor. Gregg sold me mine. I have no idea what the HP is.

Well, take a look at the motor plate and read the Watts rating on the motor. 400 Watt motor represents a 1/2 HP motor. 1 HP in Watts is roughly 745 Watts.

Thanks a Bunch,
Dennis Peacock
Mojo
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +0/-0
: 4103


I'm Always In Trouble


« #18 : September 15, 2010, 11:11:35 AM »

Dennis:

I forgot to mention in an earlier post that to help you better control the machine, try sewing with just your socks on your feet or use a thin slipper. You will have a better feel of the pedal this way. I always sew in my moose skin slippers. Sounds crazy but I have a much better feel of the pedal. I do not have good feeling in my feet to begin with so this helps.

Also, an old seamstress once gave me some great advice as well. Place your foot on the pedal so the ball of your feet is near the top of the pedal. This will also help with your feel in addition to helping with those jack rabbit starts. :)

If all of this fails, contact Bob Kovar and tell him you need a servo motor..................LOL.

Chris
bobbin
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +0/-0
: 2237


« #19 : September 15, 2010, 11:28:05 AM »

There are a lot of fine people selling things on E-Bay.  But there are a lot jerks out there, too.  I read some of the ads for sewing machines and I'm flabbergasted by the amount of BS.  Machines I know are "home grade" are regularly touted as "industrial".  And there is a huge aount of hoopla about "antiques".  Give me a break! old sewing machines by Singer, White, and W&G are a dime a dozen.  Most are likely worth more as scrap metal, frankly. 

If you want to purchase a new machine, Sawdustar, do yourself a big favor and contact a reputable dealer, someone you know will service your machine and help you through the learning process.  There is no substitute for a solid, respectful, working relationship with your dealer/mechanic.  Trust me on this. 
sawdustar
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 67


Pro Toothpick Maker


« #20 : September 15, 2010, 11:51:19 AM »

There are a lot of fine people selling things on E-Bay.  But there are a lot jerks out there, too.  I read some of the ads for sewing machines and I'm flabbergasted by the amount of BS.  Machines I know are "home grade" are regularly touted as "industrial".  And there is a huge aount of hoopla about "antiques".  Give me a break! old sewing machines by Singer, White, and W&G are a dime a dozen.  Most are likely worth more as scrap metal, frankly. 

If you want to purchase a new machine, Sawdustar, do yourself a big favor and contact a reputable dealer, someone you know will service your machine and help you through the learning process.  There is no substitute for a solid, respectful, working relationship with your dealer/mechanic.  Trust me on this. 

Gotcha bobbin....!!

I'm fairly limited on what I have access to UNLESS it's on the Internet. I live in central Arkansas and the only upholstery supplier is over an hours drive away from me. If I want a tool? It's an hours drive OR I have to order it online and have it shipped in.

Industrial sewing machines? Forget it.! I would have to drive to Texas to find one.

My preference is to support local shops first....and I do that...and we buy as much "American Made" stuff as we can find....but woodworking and upholstery machines and supplies? No way. Hard to find and you're going to DRIVE a ways to even get to see anything related to what you could be looking for.

As far as I'm concerned? I'm dealing with what vendors I can find right here on the forum by the advice of those that have dealt with said vendors before.

This is Dennis - In Conway - Saving his pennies to get a really nice machine one day soon.  ;)

Thanks a Bunch,
Dennis Peacock
bobbin
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +0/-0
: 2237


« #21 : September 15, 2010, 12:08:04 PM »

Dennis, I know how it can be when you live miles and miles away from the storefronts of big dealers.  I grew up in really rural place, too.  It sucked and that's why I don't live there anymore, lol!

The beauty of the internet is that you can work with great dealers from your home area.  The wider the "world wide web" becomes the closer we all are... and that means that there is probably someone relatively close by who can help you out.  Someone you may not even know about! 

Scare-y, huh? 
sofadoc
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +1/-0
: 4348


All types of upholstery.....except cars and boats.


« #22 : September 15, 2010, 07:07:58 PM »

Dennis in Conway:  I'm in Greenville, Tx (about 50 miles NE of Dallas). A&A Fabrics in Glenwood delivers to me 4 times a year. I also have a supplier in Baytown, Tx who brings supplies to me twice a year. A foam supply truck in Tyler, Tx comes once a week, as long as I give them a minimum order of $250. I haven't had anything (other than fabric) shipped to me in years.  
Have you talked to Jim at A&A? I'll bet he knows who can take care of your sewing needs in the area.
Good Luck!!
Dennis in Greenville
« : September 15, 2010, 07:36:50 PM sofadoc »

"Perfection is the greatest enemy of profitability" - Mark Cuban
sawdustar
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 67


Pro Toothpick Maker


« #23 : September 16, 2010, 07:14:17 AM »

Dennis in Conway:  I'm in Greenville, Tx (about 50 miles NE of Dallas). A&A Fabrics in Glenwood delivers to me 4 times a year. I also have a supplier in Baytown, Tx who brings supplies to me twice a year. A foam supply truck in Tyler, Tx comes once a week, as long as I give them a minimum order of $250. I haven't had anything (other than fabric) shipped to me in years.  
Have you talked to Jim at A&A? I'll bet he knows who can take care of your sewing needs in the area.
Good Luck!!
Dennis in Greenville

Dennis in Greenville,  :)

A&A in Glenwood, AR, I'll have to look them up and talk to "Jim". Thanks for the tips and advise much appreciated.

Thanks a Bunch,
Dennis Peacock
baileyuph
Guest


« #24 : September 16, 2010, 08:23:26 AM »

Quote
A&A in Glenwood, AR, I'll have to look them up and talk to "Jim". Thanks for the tips and advise much appreciated.



Dennis, A & A in Glenwood is a good company for all your upholstery needs and I too think Jim can give you local machine support contact.  Little Rock will have someone for sure, they always did.  It won't be a car dealer affair, maybe a mechanic with a box of tools and knowledge but he knows where to get the machine parts.  Shreveport , La. used to have a couple machine suppliers and service.  I still buy from A & A and will look up their phone number, if you are against a stone wall.  The number is at my business.  Let me know if you can't connect. 

I am in St.Louis and we have excellent service/sales support, plus at least two local suppliers for machine parts.  I can drive to them within 20 minutes and get anything that is available. 

Don't get dismayed, service is out there, try Jim for starters, as they might be closer.  If you need phone numbers let us know, best to check out your back door.

Doyle
sofadoc
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +1/-0
: 4348


All types of upholstery.....except cars and boats.


« #25 : September 16, 2010, 08:54:31 PM »

Dennis: Another good source of info for you might Jack Carr. He lives just down the road from you in Vilonia.
He has a nice website with a discussion board similar to this one:
www.carrscorner.com

"Perfection is the greatest enemy of profitability" - Mark Cuban
hdflame
Administrator
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +0/-0
: 1507


"Quality is not expensive, it's PRICELESS!"


« #26 : September 17, 2010, 09:28:04 AM »


I have GOT to do something about that clutch motor. Wide open or stop just doesn't get it. I know that "finesse" on the pedal and one can learn to control the speed of the machine, but I have a lead foot and I can get it to just start and then it takes off while I'm trying to figure out how to keep it all under some kind of manageable control.  :-[

This is the servo motor I got on my machine from Keystone, I can sew one stitch at a time.  Plenty of control and power.  Best money you can spend IMO. ;D  And it includes shipping.  We have 2 machine companies on the board.  I bought mine from Gregg at Keystone.  Bob Kovar is the other one.  I don't personally know him, but he gets good reviews on here too.  I would stay away from buying a servo on eBay.  No matter how cheap it is, it's not a good deal if it won't do what you want! :'(


http://www.keysew.com/Reliable_Sewquiet_4000.htm

Bobby
www.riddlescustomupholstery.com
www.sunstopper.biz
Several Old Singers
Elna SU
Older Union Special
BRAND NEW Highlead GC0618-1-SC
and a new Cobra Class 4 Leather Machine  ;)
sawdustar
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 67


Pro Toothpick Maker


« #27 : September 19, 2010, 06:00:36 AM »

Well, It's about time to gear up for more upholstery work. The LOML and I are working more stuff and we are finding that Naugahyde is not the easiest stuff to work with on ones FIRST upholstery project.  ;)

We have a recliner that needs some repair as well as recovering. We've bought some cloth upholstery material to recover it with (on sale) and we are planning on selling it to a needy family that really has no furniture, for just the cost of the material ($25).

You see, we are a family that looks to help and serve others. We buy groceries for those that are hungry, we mow lawns of the sick and elderly, we clean houses for those that are sick and can't do it on their own, we cut and deliver for free, firewood to a couple of elderly couples who would otherwise not have heat for the winter.

After all, it's not about us...it's about the One that has called us to serve others in love and grace.  ;D

Thanks a Bunch,
Dennis Peacock
Darren Henry
YaBB God
*****

Karma: +1/-0
: 5587

some days are better than others


« #28 : September 19, 2010, 10:37:29 AM »

Quote
Also, an old seamstress once gave me some great advice as well. Place your foot on the pedal so the ball of your feet is near the top of the pedal.

 :o :o :o You've got to be kidding,Chris. That is akin to moving the seat of your car back so that you can only reach the brake pedal with a toenail and trying to run the gas pedal without your heel on the floor.

Dennis; flip back through the archives. I've posted a zillion times about the importance of body posture and foot position for speed control. Short version is thigh parallel to floor, lower leg vertical, and ankle over the pivot of the treadle. The best "training aids" I ever had were my old treadle sewing machines.Anytime a new sewwer (sp) had speed issues, I'd put them on one of them until they found that sweet spot where it was just a rock of the one foot to run the machine. This is where you want to be on an electric as well. The difference is amazing. The most common problem is for them to want to be too close to the project. This bends the lower leg back and they seldom even think about what they are sitting on.

I was once told I was full of bunk with this; so I proved it to the guy. I sat him "correctly" in the middle of the room and put the remote on the floor. First i had him wiggle his toes, then touch buttons on the remote. Then I had him sit "incorrectly" and do the same drills. Try it. Move the remote back 4-6" and the chair up/down the same.

Life is a short one way trip, don't blow it!Live hard,die young and leave no ill regrets!
hidebound
Jr. Member
**

Karma: +0/-0
: 74


« #29 : September 20, 2010, 07:56:56 PM »

     I am very new at sewing and I read a post by Darren about the correct way to position yourself to sew. I am here to tell you you will be amazed at the difference. I had the same issues as you start slow then take off like a bat out of hades, or just take off full speed. After positioning my legs and properly I can consistently stitch1 stitch at a time on a clutch machine. Sometimes it gets away fom me still, but I get better every time I sit down at the machine.
: 1 [2] 3 4  
« previous next »
:  



Latex Mattress    Foam Order allows you to design your own latex mattress using layers of certified natural and organic components.
Organic Mattress     Foam Order makes a wonderful organic mattress using certified natural and organic components. Choose your own firmness.
SMF 2.0.14 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines