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Which one would you choose - Brand New Upholstery Machine?

Started by slodat, June 23, 2011, 09:13:40 am

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slodat

I bought a used Adler 291 today from a local dealer. It has a new servo motor on it. He is going to give me all of the automatic controls that the machine came from the factory with. I'm not sure I'll get it all on the machine. It didn't cost anything. The controls are auto-backtack, thread trim, air operated and auto foot lift, etc. Thus far I am quite happy with the machine being more manual. It is the predecessor of the current 867 which is the top of the line upholstery machine. It sews amazing. Has a nice long stitch when I need it. The feed is better than anything I have used. Completely automatically oiled. It is a very nice machine. All for $700! He has a few more of these machines available too!

This save me about $2000, literally!

fragged8

hiya

the Adler 291 or Durkopp 291 is a Rolls Royce of machines you got a machine that will last a lifetime
I had a 291 long arm and like a complete fool sold it. They are a solid built machine but spares can be very
expensive.

ALJ

My Juki has never given me any bother, it runs like clockwork and also needs very little maintenance
because it has a sealed oil system, not like the more common oil sump.
I've had 2 machines with Efka systems on them and both have never been a problem, they do make
sewing easier and i would hate to have a main machine without one now. It won't help you sew a straight line
but it will do the hand operations for you like reaching back for the foot lift lever, leave the needle up or down
when you stop automatically so you don't have to tickle the drive pedal or turn the wheel and it will do the back tacking
if you tell it to. you can also dial the max sewing speed up or down which helps.

one extra thing you will need is a small compressor to run the air lift and the air switch for reverse.
for you

slodat

Quote from: fragged8 on June 30, 2011, 08:27:51 pm
the Adler 291 or Durkopp 291 is a Rolls Royce of machines you got a machine that will last a lifetime
I had a 291 long arm and like a complete fool sold it. They are a solid built machine but spares can be very
expensive.


I am having a bit of time finding feet for this machine. Do you happen to know if Adler 767 style feet will fit this machine?

I am very pleased with this machine. It feeds like nothing I have ever used. Very, very nice machine to work with.

fragged8

hiya

I'm not familiar with the 767 but if you pm Gregg on here
i'm sure he will sort you out.

Gregg @ Keystone Sewing

if you can. buy non genuine feet, Durkopp/Adler ones are going to
cost you an arm and leg.

Rich



thomas_sew24

For those who may not know it: The Juki LU-2210 is mostly a copy of the famous Dürkopp Adler class 767-FA-373. The hook is the same, the thread trimming knives are the same, and even the standard sewing gauge parts from the 767 fit on the Juki 2210. The 767 is copied by various chinese companies, too, like Highlead.
The 767 is no longer produced. The new model from Dürkopp Adler is the M-Type series with classes 867, 868, 869, 888, etc.
The M-Type is a modular concept: Most of the mechanical parts of one model also fit on any other M-Type model.
It has 30% less mechanical parts and 20% more feeding power than the 767 . All cover parts are fixed with only 10 different screws. The machine has 20mm sewing foot lift and 9mm foot stroke of alternating sewing feet.
The under arm clearance is 335 mm, and the underarm height is 125mm.
I think, this is the real industry standard for home and car upholstery and the leading technology.

slodat

I ultimately sold the Adler because it was hard to find economically priced feet for it. I ordered a brand new machine from Gregg at Keystone. I can't wait for it to get here.

BigJohn

Jim101:
     My first machine was a 111W153 and I too found it easy to work on and parts were readily available at comparatively low cost, the things It lacked was the higher lift of the 111W155 and reverse found on most newer machines based on the old Singer.