• Welcome to The Upholster.com Forum. Please login or sign up.
 
July 15, 2020, 09:21:50 am

News:

Welcome to our new upholstery forum with an updated theme and improved functionality. We welcome your comments and questions to our forum! Visit our main website, Upholster.com, for our extensive supply of upholstery products, instructional information and videos, and much more.


Which fabric use for a outside tent/gazibo

Started by superfly, June 01, 2012, 10:10:41 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

superfly

Hi everyone,

I am planning at the moment to build a big tent/gazibo about 6m*2.6m and 3.8 high. I am basically going to work on my restoration project under this.

So I am after a heavy rain, and UV resistance material which can stay outside for a long time.

At the moment I thought of using a plastic builder and sew the parts together, or use some tarpaulin. The tarpaulin is more costly as I have the builder already.

That is the only material I know which might be suitable but you might have another idea?

I was just thinking it could be nice to have some clear plastic for the sunroof so I can use the sun light.

Any idea more than welcome.

I can't wait to do my first project, since I bought the machin 2 years ago now, I only had time to do a cousin project.
But now it looks like thing are clearing up and I will have more time.

Cheers
Arnaud

Mojo

It sounds as if your in Europe. if this is the case then Suzi ( Grebo ) would be a better person to answer your question as she is familiar with what is available there. Myself I would be looking at something like Weathermax if your looking for watertight applications.

Another possibility is Recacril or Sattler.

Chris

superfly

Thanks Mojo.

You are right I am in europe, thanks a million for the 3 potential fabric reference.
I will try to call the supplier in the morning and see if it is available.

I will try to send a PM to Grebo as well.

Thanks a million again.

bobbin

In the USA there is product called "Patio 500" (a vinyl over a polyester scrim) that is available in a "clear"... we use it frequently to create a "skylight" in a canopy.  Its strong and durable, but it's heavy and it can crease if you're not careful handling it. 

I would also suggest you look into having any panels heat welded together.  Stitching is bound to fail with time (maybe that's not an issue for you) and exposure to sunlight and the elements. 

What country are you in, Arnaud?

superfly

Hi bobbin,

I am in Ireland.

I am into a rented place so I need to see with the land lord, for any permanent build. So it is how I got the gazibo idea.
What do you mean by panel heat?

Thanks for the ref for the patio 500. It is raining right now so I can't work on my car which is annoying me so I am broswing internet for idea how to fix my problem  :)

sofadoc

"Perfection is the greatest enemy of profitability" - Mark Cuban

bobbin

June 02, 2012, 07:41:22 pm #6 Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 07:47:31 pm by bobbin
Arnaud, because the fabrics come in fixed widths it's usually necessary to sew panels together to achieve the desired width for a "blank", the rough size required to achieve the finished product you have in mind.  In the USA  most goods come in 46-60 inch widths.   Please excuse the lack of metric measurements, I don't have a measuring tape/stick that offers both handy and (like most Americans) I don't "think" in metric!  I routinely make canopies and awnings that are quite wide and rather than sew the panels of fabric together we regularly send them out to a local company that heat welds them together.  "Welding" is achieved by taping the edges of the fabric, laying one over the other and then bringing a bar down over the the joined pcs..  The bar is then heated and the two layers of fabric are heated and thus melded together.  It's strong, secure, and impervious to the ravages of sun and the elements.  

If you're looking for a quick, cheap solution it is prolly not the way for you to go.  But if you want something that will last a long time and you have the option, heat welding's a very good thing to consider!

Mike

I used to have a shop and outside i had a coverit tent that tou uleould use sd. Temporary garage   Do they have rhem in ireland ?

Grebo

Just got up to date on this  :-[

Yes Fragged8 is your better option  ;)

Europe is a big place  ;D

Suzi

Mojo

Quote from: Grebo on June 04, 2012, 10:53:33 am
Just got up to date on this  :-[

Yes Fragged8 is your better option  ;)

Europe is a big place  ;D

Suzi


Is he still around ? I rarely see him post anymore.

Chris

Grebo

June 04, 2012, 02:14:55 pm #10 Last Edit: June 04, 2012, 02:16:07 pm by Grebo
Busy with the new shop I believe  ;)

http://snuggs.me.uk/forum/index.php

Or so he says  :P

Suzi

kodydog

Careful Suzi, you do know he has the power to delete and ban certain posts all under the guise of a virus.  :D
There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
http://northfloridachair.com/index.html

Grebo

June 05, 2012, 09:11:47 am #12 Last Edit: June 05, 2012, 09:13:24 am by Grebo
Richard NO  :o shirly not  ;D   You must be mistaken  :P

Suzi

superfly

Thanks for all those information.

I actually cleared the planning permission issue yesterday, so it should be good.

Quote from: Mike on June 03, 2012, 03:03:15 am
I used to have a shop and outside i had a coverit tent that tou uleould use sd. Temporary garage   Do they have rhem in ireland ?


Not as I have seen, I think it is because of planning permission issue.

Thanks bobbin, for the heat welding process idea, and no worries for the metric conversion.

I am going to contact Fragged8 and see what  we can get around the UK and Ireland, I am planning to go the supplier and see what we have there.