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cleaning blood off fabric

Started by JDUpholstery, October 13, 2012, 03:48:19 am

Previous topic - Next topic

JDUpholstery

I posted this question in my project page, but figuring not many are following my work so figured I would ask this in a new topic, might be useful to someone else this way

I nicked my arm and did not move fast enough so dropped some blood on the couch I am recovering...I cleaned up most of it with cold water, but it is still there...

it is a fairly small drop, but on this light fabric it stands out pretty bad...

anyone have any idea how I can clean this off, I would really prefer not to have to remove the entire inside back because of 1 drop of blood, but I will (using the inside back for other pieces of course)



Thanks in advance for any advice

Jim101

Oxyclean works pretty good for getting out stains.  It doesn't discolor either.

Thinking it would work pretty good for getting out blood stains.

Jim

gene

Try using your own spit. There's an enzyme in our spit that matches our blood, or something like that.

I have only tried this on fresh blood and it works perfectly. I've never tried it on dried blood though.

I remember vividly the first time I was told about this and I tried it - white fabric that I just got fitted perfectly on a barrel back chair.

Good luck.

gene


QUALITY DOES NOT COST, IT PAYS!

MinUph

Paul
Minichillo's Upholstery
Website

needles eye

chuck in container-

1 cup of cold water
1 teaspoon washing up detergent
pinch of anything "oxy" washing powder or use "Napisan"
2 tablespons white vinegar
2 tablespoons ammonia

Dab this mixture on the stain. Heaps..

Then sprinkle with bicarbonate (bicarb) of soda and scrub gently.

Rinse with straight white vinegar

There will be a small fizzing reaction as the vinegar and bicarb reacts.

Rinse in water.

Stand on a towel on the stain, that is, try to absorb the stain into towel.

Repeat if necessary.

Stain will appear darker when wet but lighten as material dries.

If stain still remains console yourself with a bloody mary maybe.

Cheers


scott_san_diego

Cigarette lighter fluid.

Always have a bottle around to remove glue, grease, or blood.
Haven't had it discolored any fabrics, but always test it on a piece of scrap material first.

SHHR


sofadoc

Like Scott said, test any method on a scrap piuece first.
Another method that I sometimes have success with, is to dab it with a mild soapy solution, and blast it with an air hose as I dab.

Products like "Oops" and "Goof Off" work similar to lighter fluid. But they may leave a ring on a light colored fabric.

I really don't have a problem with blood stains anymore.......the IRS already got it all. :D
"Perfection is the greatest enemy of profitability" - Mark Cuban

byhammerandhand

Saw your request over at Carr's Corner first and answered there: http://www.carrscorner.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=6471.msg45471#msg45471

I do several hundred cleanings a year of all sorts of stains.   Dried blood is just one of them.  I can't remember the last time I had a stain that I could not get out.

I would be skeptical of non-polar solvents such as naphtha (lighter fluid), xylene (Goof Off), etc.   The chemistry just would not seem to work
Keith

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas A. Edison

JDUpholstery

my wife is a nurse and she brought home some heparin (the blood thinner), they use it at work to remove blood from their scrubs....it worked pretty good...still have a small amount that seems caught in the fibers, noticeable to me because I know where to look. I will try treating it again and see if I can get the last of it out

cthomps

Gene is right.  Your own saliva will dissolve your own blood.  It is an old quilters trick.  Blood from finger pricks while quilting is quite common. Some times it takes more than one application :D and you need to let it work a bit.  Carol
"Trying to make a living, one stitch at a time."

west coast

Use your own spit just make sure you get all the coffee out first!