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Does everyone use an Industrial Serger on boat covers?

Started by old, June 15, 2010, 04:55:57 pm

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old

Does everyone use an Industrial Serger on boat covers?

If so, what make and model of machine is best to buy?

If not, what do you do to the seams?

Kathy

timtheboatguy

I have never used one. For the seams I use a hot knife to cut the fabric for Sunbrella and then either fold under and stich or sometimes use binding depending on if it is an edge or just a seam.

Tim
http://www.timtheboatguy.com

We are not retreating - we are advancing in another direction.
Douglas MacArthur

fragged8

hiya

  I have a serger but i only use it for fabrics that ravel easily when doing
upholstery.

you don't need one for boat covers

rich

Twat of the North

Sunbrella plus = no need
seamark sunbrella = no need
regular ol' Sunbrella=  nice sharp pair of pinking shears....
Or go ahead and bind  or overlock the whole job...
Otherwize cut it all out by sweating over a glowing hot knife and be sure to inhale
all that formaldahide...  Tough call...
How much did you charge ?....... let it fray ! javascript:replaceText('%20:o',%20document.forms.postmodify.message);:o

JuneC

I bind the whole mess with centerfold binding.  I don't like the hot knife - too slow and I don't like the fumes.  I'd never deliver a cover that has the possibility of fraying.  Not in this market.  It'd be the end of my business.  Pinking shears - did that once or twice -my hands can't take it.  So, the centerfold not only stops fraying, but it also protects the gelcoat from those sharp/rough melted edges caused by the hot knife.  Good selling point in a market where people are willing to pay for quality and protecting their investment. 

June
"Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people."

     W. C. Fields

Mike8560

me2 June I even bind the seam on sea mark just to make it look nice did that on the sea ray in my jerk around thread. I agree it too slow cutting with a hot knife. I used to do that but not much now. I still use it but for other stuff.

hdflame

June, How does the centerfold binding method work?

Bobby
www.riddlescustomupholstery.com
www.sunstopper.biz
Several Old Singers
Elna SU
Older Union Special
BRAND NEW Highlead GC0618-1-SC
and a new Cobra Class 4 Leather Machine  ;)

Mike8560

Bobby when I sew a seam on a top face to face I bind the underside then I top stitch the seam as you woulould normally but now it has a nice finnished inside that wont ravle.

hdflame

Quote from: Mike8560 on June 17, 2010, 03:46:06 am
Bobby when I sew a seam on a top face to face I bind the underside then I top stitch the seam as you woulould normally but now it has a nice finnished inside that wont ravle.


So, if I'm uderstanding correct, you bind the two edges while you sew the together face to face?  Then fold to one side and topstitch?

Also, not to hijack the thread, but do you ever use vents like this on boat tops?
http://www.montanagrills.com/

I'm thinking about putting them in my grill cover.

Bobby
www.riddlescustomupholstery.com
www.sunstopper.biz
Several Old Singers
Elna SU
Older Union Special
BRAND NEW Highlead GC0618-1-SC
and a new Cobra Class 4 Leather Machine  ;)

fragged8

hiya

i guess that takes a lot of practice with the binding attachment ?

When i use mine I dont always get the material evenly fed into the binder
so some places the binding  V is closer than others.

I'm sure if i did it your way Mike i could pump out tops a lot quicker.

bobbin

I love my "heiberschnieder" (hot knife).   I cut all acrylics with it!  It's quick, efficient, and in a properly ventilated area the fumes are no big deal.  I feel that a properly hot knifed edge is very stable, esp. when turned and topstitched.  Adding the cost of finished edge binding and then the time spent setting up the machine to bind has got to cut into profit or undercut your bid.  If it's not an issue in your market, it won't matter, but time is money. 

Using the same reasoning, I wouldn't bother with an overlock machine for marine work, either.  A hot knife is quicker, and a lot cheaper when you factor in the added cost of additonal cones of thread.  And trust me, overlocks eat thread!

I own a Willcox&Gibbs  5 thread overlock, circa 1978.  It's a beautiful machine and I love it, but I only use it for garment or drapery work... or to secure the edge of very ravelly fabric for slipcovers or upholstery work. 

JuneC

Quote from: hdflame on June 17, 2010, 03:55:47 am
Quote from: Mike8560 on June 17, 2010, 03:46:06 am
Bobby when I sew a seam on a top face to face I bind the underside then I top stitch the seam as you woulould normally but now it has a nice finnished inside that wont ravle.


So, if I'm uderstanding correct, you bind the two edges while you sew the together face to face?  Then fold to one side and topstitch?



I don't bind when joining - I like my joining seam to be at least 1/2" from the edge.  I bind while topstitching (sew from underside and hand-apply the binding to the edges as I stitch).  I don't bind if the edges are factory woven and won't ravel anyway, but if one edge is scissor cut I'll bind.

June
"Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people."

     W. C. Fields